Letter to the Hebrews

Written around A.D. 63, the epistle to the Hebrews continues to have an unknown author. While it was first believed to have been written by Paul, more recent analysis of the letter revealed a writing style different than the apostle to the Gentiles. What is important to know about this New Testament book is that is was accepted a divinely appointed, and its content was found as sound and of great value to believers and seekers alike.

The letter originated from Italy at a time when Jews were being persecuted in Jerusalem, and as decades started to pile up, Jesus’ return seemed nowhere in sight. The targeted audience for this epistle were Christian Jews, otherwise known as Messianic Jews, a Christian denomination that combines Christianity, specifically the belief that Jesus is the promised Messiah with elements of Judaism and Jewish tradition. Those who received and shared the letter were in need of reassurance, as Jesus proved to be a far stretch from the militant king expected by the Jews, rather God chose to walk the earth as a vagabond, and eventually allow Himself to be arrested and nailed to a cross where the Messiah endured suffering and eventually, a horrible death at the hands of the Romans.

What is know of the author of this book is that he was a companion to Timothy, and was familiar with old testament teaching as numerous mentions of prophets are mentioned in this “word of exhortation.” Also, the book’s author uses many comparisons between old testament prophecies and new covenant truths to declare Christianity the only path to God and Heaven. Ultimately, the main goal of the letter to the Hebrews is to define Christ’s role as mediator between us and God.

Further more, Hebrews aims at preventing apostasy, a trend by which the church is divided as believers flea from unity, instead embracing paganism or returning to Jewish rites, thereby abandoning their Christian commission.

The letter, written in Greek features two main channels. The first is expositional or doctrinal in which the author outlines a series of statements intended to strengthen his readers The second strand focuses on warnings meant to instill fear in his audience who became short sighted when they found themselves under attack by the enemy.

In the epistle, the author declares God as the Creator of the universe, and proclaims Jesus as the Son of God, a man, divinely born and above all men, angels and prophets. In Hebrews, we find that the highest of priests, Yeshua, was a perfect being who resisted temptation and shed His own blood on the cross, rather than sacrificial blood from animals.

Lastly, this letter provides its readers with the fact Jesus was a human being, tempted as we all are but gifted with strength beyond our own that stemmed from God and the Holy Spirit. It is through Him we can resist temptation, and by His sacrifice and god’s grace we can be saved from the wages of sin. Let’s pray!

Father God;
We thank you for your blessings in our lives,
We praise you Lord for the wisdom found through the Letter to the Hebrews,
We ask you Lord to inspire us to use these verses in our lives
As we continue to learn more about you through your word.

Lord we ask you to strengthen us each day as we endure through battles,
Allow us to praise and love each other through faith in you Jesus,
Shield us from evil through truth, the gospel, salvation and prayer,
Guide us to abide by your word as we spread your gospel to one and all
Becoming examples of faith through our character as we walk the narrow path.

God we pray that you will continue to bless us, to bless our lives and fill us with hope
We ask you Lord to guide our footsteps and lead us to the way everlasting,
Through faith in you Lord we seek salvation and a place with you in heaven
According to your ways, your everlasting wisdom and strength.

May your will be done
In our lives, for your life.

We thank you for your love and all you bless us with each day.

Praise God,
Amen!

This message was written by Daniel St.Pierre
Email: danielstpierre@thrivethroughchrist.com

Posted in Bible Studies.

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